Examining ICU Nurses' Knowledge of Ventilator-Associated Events and Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia

Dorothy J. Sanders-Thompson, Walden University

Abstract

Ventilator-associated events (VAEs) are patients' complications of respiratory conditions including ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Research shows that VAP is the most common hospital-acquired infection among ventilated patients and a leading source of mortality. With greater risk for complications among ventilated- supported patients, nurses working in the ICU must keep abreast of new knowledge and update expertise to develop technical and clinical skills in daily practice. The purpose of this project was to assess whether an educational intervention would increase the ICU nurses' level of knowledge of the evidence-based intervention. Knowles' adult learning theory was chosen for this project. A paired-samples t-test was conducted to examine nurses' knowledge of VAE/VAP using a questionnaire measuring knowledge of VAP; 58 ICU nurses participated an educational intervention. Findings showed that nurses had an increase in knowledge following the education (M = 11.43, SD = .775) compared to nurses prior to education (M = 9.55, SD = .976), t(57) = -26.884, p < .001. Results of this project may guide the use of an evidence-based practice educational intervention to improve the quality and safety of ventilated patients. The implications for positive social change include preventing VAEs/VAP among patients, thus decreasing the length of hospital stay, cost, and deaths related to ventilator infections.