A Qualitative Phenomenological Review of Hispanic Women's Journey to an Executive Level Position

Olga Lydia Piedra, Walden University

Abstract

The purpose of this phenomenological research study was to explore the lived experiences of Hispanic women in executive leadership positions. This study was conducted to provide information on the gap in the literature pertaining to Hispanic women having to use strategies in order to obtain an executive level position. The data analysis answered the research question relating to what strategies Hispanic women use to enter into executive level positions. The conceptual framework for this study included cultural expectations, unequal opportunities and lack of diversity Hispanic women face in the workplace through a social cognitive career theory exploring how the 15 Hispanic women executives may have used self-efficacy, expected outcomes, and goals to advance into an executive level position. Data was collected by interviews and coded using NVivo software where nodes, themes and trends were found. The themes that emerged were education, organization, and promotion. Networking and education were the predominant themes, indicating that making and creating professional relationships and continuing one's education were essential to successful promotion to executive level positions for Hispanic women. This research study may assist Hispanic women gain the knowledge and expertise to excel and socially change the way Hispanic women enter executive level positions.