Date of Conferral

2019

Degree

Ph.D.

School

Management

Advisor

David Gould

Abstract

Fatal occupational injury is a construction and management problem in the United States. Fatality rates among specialty trade contractors made up the largest percent of fatalities in construction at 62% per year. The purpose of this nonexperimental study was to examine the relationship between the quality of information in construction safety plans and construction safety among specialty trade contractors. The theoretical foundations for the study were Petersen’s accident/incident theory and work systems theory. The key research question was to examine the relationship between information quality and construction safety among specialty trade contractors. A survey with closed-ended questions was used to collect primary data from a self-selection sample of 134 specialty trade contractors in the United States. Spearman rank correlation coefficient (rs) was used to measure the strength of the relationship between information quality and construction safety. Results indicated that the quality of information in construction safety plans (measured by the relevance, accuracy, timeliness, and completeness of information) did not have any statistically significant relationships with construction safety among U.S. specialty trade contractors. Further research is needed to understand if the variables used in this study are relevant predictors for construction safety. This study connects with positive social change by bringing into focus quality information systems research required to improve safety among U.S. specialty trade contractors and provide safety professionals a direction for continuous safety improvement in the U.S. construction industry, thus benefitting construction stake holders.

Share

 
COinS