Date of Conferral

2019

Degree

Ph.D.

School

Psychology

Advisor

Dr. Rolande Murray

Abstract

Parental functioning and behaviors in the family impact the outcomes of adolescents; however, few researchers have identified how age-specific parental behaviors and parental stressors impact young children's social-emotional problems in low socioeconomic Hispanic families with children ages 6-11. Based on the family stress model, the purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to examine the relationship between parental behaviors (parental support, involvement, communication, and limit setting) and parental stress on children's social-emotional problems (internalizing and externalizing behavior problems), and the mediating effect of parental behaviors in low socioeconomic Hispanic families with children ages 6-11. A sample of 63 low socioeconomic, Hispanic mothers self-reported their perceived stress, parent-child relationship, and child's behavioral and emotional problems. The data were coded and grouped into 4 path analysis models based on the Pearson r correlation analysis, which indicated a significant relationship between parental behaviors and parental stress on children's externalizing behavior problems. The path analysis indicated that parental behaviors did not mediate the relationship between parental stress and children's externalizing behavior problems. The findings from this study have the potential to benefit low socioeconomic Hispanic families and their young children by improving the quality of parenting and developing and/or improving more targeted and relevant interventions for parent support, potentially leading to an overall community improvement of parent-child relationship and child outcomes.

Available for download on Thursday, February 20, 2020

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