Date of Conferral

2018

Degree

Ph.D.

School

Public Health

Advisor

Hadi Danawi

Abstract

A paucity of information exists on the benefits of using radiation therapy for treating women with early cervical cancer detection. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the association between early versus late testing of Human papilloma virus (HPV), age, race, radiation therapy, and regions in United States, and survival rates among women diagnosed with early cervical cancer. The epidemiological triad of person, time, and space guided this study to explain the regional spread of cervical cancer, and the effect of early testing. Secondary data from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) were used (N= 520,153). Statistical analyses included descriptive statistics as well as binary and multiple logistic regression. According to multiple logistic regression tests early testing for HPV saved more women from cervical cancer death (Odds ratio = .917, CI = .896 - .939, P = .000), and women with radiation therapy had increase likelihood of dying (Odds ratio = 1.646, CI = 1.626 â?? 1.667, P = .000). Older Women had increased likelihood of dying when diagnosed with cervical cancer (Odds ratio = 1.043, CI = 1.042 â?? 1.044, P = .000).Whites had a reduced likelihood of dying when diagnosed with cervical cancer (Odds ratio = .735, CI = .722 - .748, P = .000) compared to non-Whites with increased likelihood of dying when diagnosed with cervical cancer (Odds ratio = 1.3605, CI = .722 - .748). Alaskans had a reduced likelihood of dying compared to women living in the Pacific Coast (Odds ratio = .714, CI = .598 -.853, P = .000). Increased awareness among women on radiation therapy for early detection of cervical cancer can improve survival and lead to positive social change.

Included in

Epidemiology Commons

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