Date of Conferral

2017

Degree

Doctor of Healthcare Administration, DHA

School

Health Services

Advisor

Diana Naser

Abstract

The factors associated with the decision of African American women to undergo/forego breast reconstruction after mastectomy has not been well researched. The purpose of this quantitative, correlational study was to determine the extent to which certain factors (age, religion, confidence level, and education) were associated with the decision to forgo or undergo breast reconstruction after mastectomy among African American women. Using the social-cognitive theory as the framework, the study focused on the decision-making process regarding breast reconstruction after mastectomy among African American women in Florida. The research questions for this study were to determine to what extent age, religion, confidence level, and education are associated with the decision of African American women to forego or undergo breast reconstruction after mastectomy. Data were collected using the Decision Self-efficacy and Religious Coping Activities scales from 88 African American women living in North Central Florida who had a mastectomy. Data were analyzed using Chi-square test and logistic regression. The results showed a significant relationship (p = .042) between the confidence level of decision-making and the decision to forego or undergo breast reconstruction after mastectomy. It was important to examine the extent to which certain factors contributed to decision-making about breast reconstruction after mastectomy in African American women as this can provide an opportunity to cultivate positive social change by being able to tailor support services for African American women after mastectomy based on the role various factors may play.

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