Date of Conferral

1-1-2009

Degree

Ph.D.

School

Management

Advisor

Walter McCollum

Abstract

Knowledge management has been extensively studied from the single organization (intra-organizational) perspective for many years. Although the literature on intra-organizational knowledge is extensive, there still exist gaps in the literature with regards to knowledge being shared by multiple organizations (inter-organizational knowledge). Inter-organizational knowledge satisfaction is gained when the organizations successfully embody the knowledge gained via the cooperation and crystallizes that knowledge within the organization. The problem addressed in this study is the lack of a model for predicting inter-organizational knowledge satisfaction utilizing task characteristics and the knowledge conversion process. The purpose of the study was to predict inter-organizational knowledge satisfaction for a contract company. The research question addressed how task characteristic and knowledge conversion can predict inter-organizational knowledge satisfaction. The theoretical frameworks include Nonaka's theory on organizational knowledge creation and Becerra-Fernandez and Sabherwal's theory for task characteristics. The study is a correlation research design using multiple linear regression as the data analysis method. An online questionnaire was administered to all executives, first- and mid-level managers, and professionals. The predictor variables task characteristic and knowledge conversion are used to predict inter-organizational knowledge satisfaction (IOKS). Predictor variables accounted for 35.3% of the variance in the IOKS score. This study contributes to social change by helping organizations gain a competitive advantage through developing and implementing both creative and timely knowledge management initiatives to gain inter-organizational knowledge satisfaction.