Date of Conferral

2017

Degree

Doctor of Public Health (DrPH)

School

Public Health

Advisor

Chinaro Kennedy

Abstract

Global Climate Change has empirical evidence to support the idea that CO2 levels may be affecting weather and health, including rates of infectious diseases. The Midwest region of the United States of America has had the highest increase in giardiasis rates in recent years, and Missouri was chosen for this study as a representative state in the Midwest. There is no definitive answer as to why the rates of giardiasis have changed from 2003 â?? 2013. The Theory of Climate Change was used as the theoretical framework for this study. The purpose of this research was to determine whether temperature, precipitation and CO2 levels are associated with giardiasis. A cross-sectional design was used for this study with a non-probability sample of reported cases of giardiasis for 2003 â??2013, and data were analyzed using a bivariate analysis and multivariate analysis. There was a negative association between precipitation and number of cases of giardiasis in Missouri residents (p < .05), a positive association between temperature and number of cases of giardiasis in Missouri residents (p < .05), and a positive association between CO2 levels and number of cases of giardiasis in Missouri residents (p < .05). Levels of CO2 modified the association between precipitation and number of cases of giardiasis in Missouri residents (p < .05). Levels of CO2 modified the association between temperature and number of cases of giardiasis in Missouri residents (p < .05). These results demonstrate that climatic factors impact public health significantly. The implications for social change are to have the waterways, wells, and public water tested more often, to reinforce the waterway closures with increased measures to prevent morbidity and mortality with giardiasis when possible, and to raise awareness of the climatic impact on health.

Included in

Epidemiology Commons

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