Date of Conferral

2017

Degree

Doctor of Public Health (DrPH)

School

Health Services

Advisor

Richard Palmer

Abstract

The lack of knowledge of pharmacogenetic testing for cardiovascular disease (CVD), coupled with their increased risk for CVD, may impair nurses' cognitions and attitudes toward pharmacogenetic testing for CVD. The purpose of this quantitative cross-sectional correlational study, conducted with 230 RNs without CVD who worked in acute-care settings in Georgia, was to determine if their years of education, years of experience, and gender significantly influenced their perceived risk for CVD (Questions 1â??3) and their perceived knowledge of pharmacogenetic testing for CVD (Questions 4â??6), and if their perceived risk for CVD significantly influenced their acceptance of pharmacogenetic testing for CVD (Question 7). Various regression analyses (hierarchical multiple linear regression, multiple linear regression, hierarchical, linear regression) were conducted for hypothesis testing. Results showed that: (a) gender significantly predicted perceived risk for CVD, in that male nurses perceived themselves to be more at risk for CVD than did female nurses; (b) years of education was a significant predictor of knowledge of pharmacogenetic testing for CVD, in that as nurses' education level increased, so did their knowledge; and (c) knowledge of pharmacogenetic testing for CVD, but not perceived risk for CVD, significantly predicted acceptance of pharmacogenetic testing for CVD. This study may act as a catalyst to promote empirical work and inform practice in nurses' CVD health and their knowledge and acceptance of pharmacogenetic testing for CVD.

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