Date of Conferral

2016

Degree

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

School

Education

Advisor

Ann Jablonski

Abstract

Several decades of research have shown that quality teacher induction programs are effective in providing support to beginning teachers, improving teachersâ?? performance, and increasing teachersâ?? self-efficacy. A large urban school district implemented a new teacher induction program and the purpose of this quantitative study was to examine the program using beginning teachersâ?? perceptions of program effectiveness, the mentor-mentee relationship, intention to remain in teaching, and self-efficacy scores. Banduraâ??s self-efficacy theory provided the framework for this study. Research questions examined the relationships among the 4 variables of interest as well as the differences in each by the number of years of participation in the induction program. A modified version of the Teacher Efficacy Survey was used to obtain data from 124 beginning teachers in their 1st, 2nd, or 3rd year of the induction program. Pearson product-moment correlations resulted in statistically significant direct relationships between induction program effectiveness and self-efficacy, induction program effectiveness and mentor-mentee relationship, and mentor-mentee relationship and self-efficacy. Analysis of variance was used to examine differences in the dependent variables by group based upon year in the program. There were no significant differences found among the groups. Insufficient variance for the intention to remain in teaching variable precluded further analysis. Recommendations for future research included examining the fidelity of implementation of the new teacher induction program. Implications for positive social change include providing initial research findings to the study districtâ??s administration on the relationships between teachersâ?? perceptions of the induction program effectiveness, the mentor-mentee relationship, intention to remain in teaching, and self-efficacy scores.

Share

 
COinS