Date of Conferral

2016

Degree

Doctor of Business Administration (D.B.A.)

School

Business Administration

Advisor

Charles Needham

Abstract

Employee turnover in the U.S. fast food industry has been high, averaging rate 150% per annum. The purpose of the correlational design study was to examine the relationships between job satisfaction factors, job dissatisfaction factors, and employee turnover intentions among fast food employees to determine whether a statistically significant relationship exists between these variables. The population for the study consisted of 144 fast food restaurant employees working in the East Coast in the United States. The theoretical framework was Herzberg's 2-factor motivation-hygiene needs theory, which describes job satisfaction factors and job dissatisfaction factors. Internet survey data of 144 participants were analyzed using Pearson-product correlation coefficients and multiple linear regressions analysis. The study findings revealed statistically significant relationships between job satisfaction factors and employee turnover intentions (p < .01), and job dissatisfaction factors and employee turnover intentions (p < .01). Among the job satisfaction factors, responsibility had a stronger relationship with employee turnover intentions (-.52) compared with other factors. Under job dissatisfaction factors, company policy had a stronger relationship with employee turnover intentions (-.52) compared with other factors. In addition, criterion variance of employee turnover intentions associated with combined job satisfaction factors was stronger (35%) than were the combined job dissatisfaction factors (31%). The study findings are designed to inform fast food restaurant managers in taking actions to reduce employee turnover, resulting in improved business financial sustainability and long-term growth.