Date of Conferral

2015

Degree

Doctor of Business Administration (D.B.A.)

School

Management

Advisor

Ify Diala

Abstract

Walden University

College of Management and Technology

This is to certify that the doctoral study by

Ingrid Hayes-Burrell

has been found to be complete and satisfactory in all respects,

and that any and all revisions required by

the review committee have been made.

Review Committee

Dr. Ify Diala, Committee Chairperson, Doctor of Business Administration Faculty

Dr. Anne Davis, Committee Member, Doctor of Business Administration Faculty

Dr. Yvette Ghormley, University Reviewer, Doctor of Business Administration Faculty

Chief Academic Officer

Eric Riedel, Ph.D.

Walden University

2015

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School-based health centers (SBHCs) have faced challenges in securing adequate funding for operations and developing sound business systems for billing and reimbursement. Specifically, administrators often lack strategies to develop and sustain funding levels to support appropriate resources for business operations. The focus of this descriptive study was to explore best practice strategies to develop and sustain funding through the experiences of SBHC administrators. The conceptual framework included Elkingtonâ??s sustainability theory, which posits that corporate social responsibility, stakeholder involvement, and citizenship improve managerâ??s effect on the business system. Twenty full-time SBHC administrators working in separate locations throughout the state of Maryland participated in semistructured telephone interviews. The van Kaam process was used to cluster descriptive experiences in data analysis that resulted in the development of thematic strategies for implementing best practices relevant to developing and sustaining funding for SBHC business operations. Major themes provided by the participants were interagency communications, creating marketing plans, and disparities in the allocation of funding for programs and professional staff. Findings indicated SBHC administrators continue to face challenges in developing and sustaining adequate funding for operations in the state of Maryland. Suggestions for future research include how administrators can develop marketing plans and explore long-range funding for SBHC services. The findings in this study may contribute to positive social change by demonstrating to officials in the Maryland State Department of Education the significance of SBHCs, and the need to increase mental health services.