Title

Predictors of Condom Use Among African American Transgender Young Adults

Date of Conferral

2015

Degree

Ph.D.

School

Public Health

Advisor

Peter A. Anderson

Abstract

Despite the continual prevention efforts in the United States, an estimated 1 million people are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and 25% of them are unaware of their infection status. There are no national surveillance data available on the incidence or prevalence of HIV/AIDS in the transgender population; this absence of data is a matter for concern. Guided by the health behavior model and social cognitive theory, this study utilized a quantitative approach to examine the associations between HIV/AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes regarding HIV/AIDS and condoms, and condom use self-efficacy as predictors of condom use in African American transgender young adults--one of the most disenfranchised and marginalized groups at increased risk for HIV infection--in the District of Columbia. Descriptive statistics, multiple regression, and chi-square analyses were used to analyze the research questions. There was no statistically significant relationship found between the dependent and independent variables at last intercourse with a steady partner. However, there was a statistically significant relationship when predicting condom use in the last 30 days and last 6 months with a steady partner. There was a statistically significant relationship for predicting condom use at last intercourse and intercourse in the last 30 days among nonsteady partners. There was no statistically significant relationship found between the dependent and independent variables at intercourse in the last 6 months with nonsteady partners. The findings could inform public health practitioners to develop and implement programs targeting African American transgender populations; the findings could also reinforce the public health policies and practices in favor of this cohort.

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